Book: A Primer in Biological Data Analysis and Visualization Using R

R Primer

Description:
R is the most widely used open-source statistical and programming environment for the analysis and visualization of biological data. Drawing on Gregg Hartvigsen’s extensive experience teaching biostatistics and modeling biological systems, this text is an engaging, practical, and lab-oriented introduction to R for students in the life sciences.

Underscoring the importance of R and RStudio in organizing, computing, and visualizing biological statistics and data, Hartvigsen guides readers through the processes of entering data into R, working with data in R, and using R to visualize data using histograms, boxplots, barplots, scatterplots, and other common graph types. He covers testing data for normality, defining and identifying outliers, and working with non-normal data. Students are introduced to common one- and two-sample tests as well as one- and two-way analysis of variance (ANOVA), correlation, and linear and nonlinear regression analyses. This volume also includes a section on advanced procedures and a chapter introducing algorithms and the art of programming using R.

About the Author:
Gregg Hartvigsen is a professor in the Department of Biology at the State University of New York at Geneseo. He taught a workshop on network analysis using R at the National Institute for Mathematical and Biological Synthesis at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville, and was a visiting scientist and site reviewer for the Mathematical Biosciences Institute at Ohio State University. He also served as co-PI on a National Science Foundation training grant for undergraduate biology and mathematics.

SECOND ANNOUNCEMENT 32th European Mustelid Colloquium

From: Ecological Society of America: grants, jobs, news [ECOLOG-L@LISTSERV.UMD.EDU] on behalf of Sebastien Devillard [sebastien.devillard@UNIV-LYON1.FR] Sent: Friday, 24 July 2015 6:20 PM
To: ECOLOG-L@LISTSERV.UMD.EDU
Subject: [ECOLOG-L] SECOND ANNOUNCEMENT 32th European Mustelid Colloquium

Dear all,

THIS IS THE SECOND ANNOUNCEMENT OF the 32th European Mustelid Colloquium !! Registration is open until September 15th 2015 and abstract submission until 1st september !!! Please register as soon as possible if you plan to come !!

It is our pleasure to announce that the 32th European Mustelid Colloquium will be held at the University of Lyon, France, from October 14-17, 2015. The colloquium is organized jointly by the French Hunting and Wildlife Agency and the Biometry and Evolutionary Biology Laboratory of the University of Lyon.
You can find all the information at the Colloquium website
http://32mustelidscol.sciencesconf.org/
The 32th European Mustelid Colloquium wants to specifically promote exchanges and discussions among European ecologists (academic, student and non-academic) working on all aspect of the Mustelids Ecology (Evolutionary Biology, Conservation and management …etc).
The Colloquium is organized into 2 days of plenary and poster sessions and a field excursion on the Saturday.
Non European people are of course welcome !

We hope to see you in all in Lyon
Feel free to contact us at 32mustelidscol@sciencesconf.org
The Organizing Committee of the32th European Mustelids Colloquium to come !!

AGU session: Terrestrial and Aquatic Responses to Changing Climate and Disturbance Regimes in Arctic and Sub-Arctic Regions

From: Ecological Society of America: grants, jobs, news [ECOLOG-L@LISTSERV.UMD.EDU] on behalf of Syndonia Bret-Harte [msbretharte@ALASKA.EDU] Sent: Saturday, 25 July 2015 3:46 AM
To: ECOLOG-L@LISTSERV.UMD.EDU
Subject: [ECOLOG-L] AGU session: Terrestrial and Aquatic Responses to Changing Climate and Disturbance Regimes in Arctic and Sub-Arctic Regions

Dear Colleagues,

We’d like to invite you to submit abstracts and participate in our upcoming AGU session:

Session ID: 8597
Session Title: Terrestrial and Aquatic Responses to Changing Climate and Disturbance Regimes in Arctic and Sub-Arctic Regions

High latitude ecosystems are undergoing rapid change as climate warms and alters disturbance regimes, particularly wildfire, permafrost thaw and insect outbreaks. Our understanding of ecosystem responses to these changes is complicated by strong feedbacks between biota and biogeochemical cycling. Remote sensing, change detection, and chronosequence studies are used to study ecosystem function under current and historical disturbance regimes. These approaches often vary between upland, wetland, and lake systems. Across all systems, patterns of interannual and seasonal variation are key knowledge gaps. This is particularly challenging for identifying trajectories of change across the landscape. Presentations are invited using remote sensing, long-term studies, or process-level experiments to improve our understanding of changes in ecosystem structure and function, for example variations in carbon and nutrient cycling, in the north. This session will enable synergies and future collaborations of researchers working across terrestrial and aquatic arctic systems at multiple spatial and temporal scales.

Invited Presenters:
Rob Striegl
Sally MacIntyre
Ruth Varner
Miriam Jones

Conveners:
Tom Douglas
Syndonia Bret-Harte
Merritt Turetsky
Jeff White

Visit the 2015 AGU Fall Meeting website for the most up-to-date information about the Fall Meeting. Registration and housing will open in August and registration rates are now posted. The deadline for all abstract submissions is Wednesday, 5 August 23:59 EDT/03:59 +1 GMT.

We look forward to your participation in this interesting session! OR if you know of colleagues who’s work might fit well in the session, please spread the word.

Syndonia Bret-Harte

Dr. M. Syndonia Bret-Harte
Associate Professor of Biology and Wildlife
Associate Science Director, Toolik Field Station
Institute of Arctic Biology
University of Alaska, Fairbanks
PO Box 757000
Fairbanks, AK 99775-7000

AGU session: Vulnerability of Permafrost Carbon to Climate Change

From: Ecological Society of America: grants, jobs, news [ECOLOG-L@LISTSERV.UMD.EDU] on behalf of Christina Schaedel [christina.schaedel@NAU.EDU] Sent: Friday, 24 July 2015 5:11 PM
To: ECOLOG-L@LISTSERV.UMD.EDU
Subject: [ECOLOG-L] AGU session: Vulnerability of Permafrost Carbon to Climate Change

Dear Colleagues,

We would like to draw your attention to our session at AGU:
?Vulnerability of Permafrost Carbon to Climate Change? (Session ID#: 8594), https://agu.confex.com/agu/fm15/preliminaryview.cgi/Session8594.

Permafrost zone soils contain between 1330-1580 Pg of carbon. Permafrost degradation can change ecosystem carbon storage by enhancing microbial activity and ecosystem respiration, but can also stimulate plant growth and increase carbon stored in vegetation and surface soil. While increased permafrost carbon emissions in a warming climate are more likely to be gradual and sustained we need a better understanding of the magnitude and timing of greenhouse gas emissions from these remote regions to fully estimate the potential feedback from permafrost carbon to climate change. This session invites papers that examine factors causing losses and gains in ecosystem carbon storage relating to the magnitude, timing and form of carbon release from permafrost. Papers may address any aspect of this topic from microbial communities to the global scale, using a range of measurements or modeling to detect and forecast permafrost thaw and the influence on the carbon cycle and future climate.

Conveners:
Christina Schaedel, Northern Arizona University, Flagstaff, AZ, United States Ted Schuur, Northern Arizona University, Flagstaff, AZ, United States Cristian Estop-Aragones, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB, Canada

Cross-Listed:
C – Cryosphere
GC – Global Environmental Change

Index Terms:
0428 Carbon cycling [BIOGEOSCIENCES]
0486 Soils/pedology [BIOGEOSCIENCES]
0702 Permafrost [CRYOSPHERE]
1615 Biogeochemical cycles, processes, and modeling [GLOBAL CHANGE]

Best wishes,
Christina Sch?del, PhD
Northern Arizona University
Center for Ecosystem Science and Society
Flagstaff, Arizona, 86011

Email: christina.schaedel@nau.edu
www.permafrostcarbon.org

New Book on Complexity, Ecology, and Conservation

From: Ecological Society of America: grants, jobs, news [ECOLOG-L@LISTSERV.UMD.EDU] on behalf of Charles Curtin [ccurtin@EARTHLINK.NET] Sent: Monday, 27 July 2015 3:44 AM
To: ECOLOG-L@LISTSERV.UMD.EDU
Subject: [ECOLOG-L] New Book on Complexity, Ecology, and Conservation

There is a new book out from Island Press linking complexity and conservation that may be of interest to Ecolog subscribers. The Science of Open Spaces, by Charles Curtin, reviews decades of experience in conserving and restoring large complex systems in both marine and terrestrial environments. As such it represents a departure from much of ecology and conservation in presenting what is essentially a whole systems approach that integrates social and ecological perspectives. The book shows how changing institutional frameworks can expand the horizons and increase the effectiveness of both ecology and conservation and make both more effective at addressing such large scale challenges as climate change and habitat fragmentation. In many respects the work also represents a case statement for large landscape approaches to ecology and conservation. Though grounded in theory, the book is largely case study driven with many examples and is intended to be readable and accessible to a broad audience with materials relevant to students, teachers, and practitioners. For more information see the link (http://www.islandpress.org/curtin). If you’d like to purchase a copy from Island Press, use discount code 4OPEN for a 20% discount.

Fish at Night Symposium: Abstracts due August 1

From: Ecological Society of America: grants, jobs, news [ECOLOG-L@LISTSERV.UMD.EDU] on behalf of Neil Hammerschlag [nhammerschlag@RSMAS.MIAMI.EDU]
Sent: Monday, 27 July 2015 4:04 AM
To: ECOLOG-L@LISTSERV.UMD.EDU
Subject: [ECOLOG-L] Fish at Night Symposium: Abstracts due August 1

http://www.rsmas.miami.edu/bms/FishAtNight/announcement.html

Abstracts are due August 1 for the FISH AT NIGHT: AN INTERNATIONAL SYMPOSIUM

To register and submit an abstract, please visit: http://www.rsmas.miami.edu/bms/FishAtNight/

Hosted by the Bulletin of Marine Science, the purpose of the symposium is to stimulate the exchange of new knowledge, data, and ideas on behaviors, patterns, and processes operating underwater, in darkness

The main conference themes include:

· Nocturnal fish behavior and ecology
· Night fishing, fisheries, and enforcement
· Deep and polar sea (“perpetual night”) fish and fisheries
· Diel fish distribution and abundance comparisons
· Methods for studying fish in darkness
· Human threats to fish at night
· Larval fish at night

Drs Euan Harvey (Curtin University in Australia) and Carl Meyer (Hawai‘i Institute of Marine Biology) will deliver keynote addresses.

The Bulletin of Marine Science encourages presentations to the symposium from all fields of marine research pertaining to fish at night. Although the focus is on marine ecosystems, relevant contributions from inland waters will also be considered. Anyone interested in the subject matter can attend the symposium. Those who wish to participate without making a poster or oral presentation are welcome.

The ultimate goal of the symposium is to produce a peer-reviewed dedicated issue that will capture the present state-of-knowledge of fish studies in the dark, identifying critical information gaps, and charting a course for future research and collaboration. Ultimately, we want to advance the current understanding of fish at night studies in the systems they occupy.

AGU/ALSO 2016 Ocean Sciences Meeting session on the Mississippi River Delta

From: Ecological Society of America: grants, jobs, news [ECOLOG-L@LISTSERV.UMD.EDU] on behalf of Yijun Xu [yjxu@LSU.EDU]
Sent: Wednesday, 22 July 2015 4:20 AM
To: ECOLOG-L@LISTSERV.UMD.EDU
Subject: [ECOLOG-L] AGU/ALSO 2016 Ocean Sciences Meeting session on the Mississippi River Delta

Dear Colleagues,

We would like to draw your attention to a 2016 Ocean Sciences Meeting session:

"Moving the Mississippi River Delta towards Long-Term Sustainability: Opportunities and Limitations"

Link to the session: https://agu.confex.com/agu/fm15/preliminaryview.cgi/Session8166

Abstract submission deadline: 23 September 2015

***Session details***

Session ID#: 9322

Session Description:

The Mississippi River Delta (MRD) region contributes an estimated $45 billion in revenue annually and has a natural capital asset estimated $1.3 trillion. The existence of the economy and associated jobs are being threatened by the rapid coastal land loss. Solutions to the problems are complicated by many challenges including riverine sediment supply, sea level rise, and maintaining navigation safety, flood control, ecological integrity, energy security, and socioeconomic/cultural assets. Despite a large number of research in the past, fundamental questions remain – Do we have sufficient scientific knowledge about the MRD? What else must we know in order to develop a sustainable solution for saving the sinking coast? How can science and policy work together to support the solution? This session aims at bringing together the endeavors of research and practices on the Mississippi River Delta as a complex dynamical system between the natural and human environments. We encourage submissions reporting results from field, modeling, and synthetic studies concerning river hydrology, sediment transport, sedimentation, coastal wetlands, energy infrastructure, population dynamics, real estate development, and policy making in the vulnerable MRD. We especially encourage presentations that stimulate intellectual discussion and critical thinking pertinent to finding an answer to the above questions.

Primary Chair: Yi-Jun Xu, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA, United States

Chairs: Nina Lam1, Brian J. Marks1 and Christopher Swarzenski2, (1)Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA, United States; (2)United States Geological Survey, Baton Rouge, LA, United States

Index Terms:

4217 Coastal processes [OCEANOGRAPHY: GENERAL]
4558 Sediment transport [OCEANOGRAPHY: PHYSICAL]
4815 Ecosystems, structure, dynamics, and modeling [OCEANOGRAPHY: BIOLOGICAL AND CHEMICAL]
6349 General or miscellaneous [POLICY SCIENCES]

Co-Sponsor(s):

B – Biogeochemistry and Nutrients

EC – Estuarine and Coastal

HI – Human Use and Impacts

MG – Marine Geology & Sedimentology

Response of terrestrial ecosystems biogeochemistry to dynamic hydrological and climatic drivers

From: Ecological Society of America: grants, jobs, news [ECOLOG-L@LISTSERV.UMD.EDU] on behalf of Melinda Smith [melinda.smith@COLOSTATE.EDU] Sent: Tuesday, 21 July 2015 5:36 AM
To: ECOLOG-L@LISTSERV.UMD.EDU
Subject: [ECOLOG-L] Response of terrestrial ecosystems biogeochemistry to dynamic hydrological and climatic drivers

Dear Colleagues,

Within the 2015 AGU Fall Meeting (14-18 December 2015, San Francisco), a session on “Response of terrestrial ecosystems biogeochemistry to dynamic hydrological and climatic drivers” will be organized by Fereidoun Rezanezhad (University of Waterloo), Geertje Pronk (University of Waterloo), Alan Knapp (Colorado State University) and Melinda Smith (Colorado State University). The description of the session content is presented below:

https://agu.confex.com/agu/fm15/preliminaryview.cgi/Session8049.html

We encourage you to submit an abstract to this session. Remember that the deadline for abstract submission is Wednesday, 5 August, 2015. Complete submission guidelines can be found on the 2015 AGU Fall Meeting Web site: http://fallmeeting.agu.org/2015/

Furthermore, we greatly would appreciate if you forward this notice to interested colleagues and students.

We are looking forward to meeting you in San Francisco.

Fereidoun Rezanezhad, Geertje Pronk, Alan Knapp and Melinda Smith

AGU session: “Climate impacts on forest ecosystems: ecohydrologic scaling from cells to landscapes”

From: Ecological Society of America: grants, jobs, news [ECOLOG-L@LISTSERV.UMD.EDU] on behalf of Franco Biondi [franco.biondi@GMAIL.COM] Sent: Thursday, 16 July 2015 2:40 AM
To: ECOLOG-L@LISTSERV.UMD.EDU
Subject: [ECOLOG-L] AGU session: “Climate impacts on forest ecosystems: ecohydrologic scaling from cells to landscapes”

Please consider submitting an abstract to the AGU session “Climate impacts on forest ecosystems: ecohydrologic scaling from cells to landscapes”, sponsored by AGU’s Atmospheric Sciences, Biogeosciences, and Hydrology sections.

We’re interested in stimulating cross-disciplinary discussion among a diverse group of scientists to reduce uncertainty in future scenarios on the composition and dynamics of forest ecosystems. Presentations on latest research results on the biophysical controls of tree growth and demography are particularly welcome. The session description available on the AGU web site is below.

“Ecohydrologic processes that control forest responses to climate change, variability, and extremes vary at multiple temporal and spatial scales. Reconciling results from plots and flux towers with those from continental gradients and remote sensing is helpful but often challenging. This session will showcase interdisciplinary contributions that quantify forest responses (wood growth, carbon fluxes, mortality episodes, etc.) and how they vary across physical and ecological gradients. We seek contributions of ecohydrologic research that disentangle the complex gradients, ecological legacies, stochastic climate variations, and anthropogenically-driven trends that affect forest trajectories. We welcome studies that address the impacts of climate extremes on forests and/or combine proxy records with remote sensing data, field observations, experiments, or simulation models. Of particular interest are studies that contrast differences between western and eastern North America, and how drought, with or without other co-occurring disturbances, has impacted forest processes in these two region.”

Conveners: Jeremy S Littell, USGS Alaska Science Center, Anchorage, USA, jlittell@usgs.gov; Franco Biondi, University of Nevada, Reno, USA, fbiondi@unr.edu, http://dendrolab.org; and Bill Anderegg, Princeton University, USA, anderegg@princeton.edu.

Confirmed Invited speakers:
Jeffrey A. Hicke, University of Idaho, http://webpages.uidaho.edu/~jhicke/ Adrian Das, USGS Western Ecological Research Center,
http://www.werc.usgs.gov/person.aspx?personID=67

The deadline to submit an abstract is 5 August, and the meeting website is http://fallmeeting.agu.org/2015/